Missoula Recycling ACT

Because sustainability is the future


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About Missoula Recycling Act

Missoula Recycling ACT!

Leachate – This refers to liquid (usually water) that absorbs solutes from pieces of physical matter as it passes through, or over it. Landfills produce massive quantities of harmful leachate when rainwater falls onto garbage heaps, absorbing things like battery acid, lead, and chemicals. This water can then be transferred to soils, bodies of water, and in turn, animals and people. – See more at: http://organic-recycling.net/uncategorized/the-problems-with-landfills/#sthash.Xkezjmmf.dpufCT!
Leachate – This refers to liquid (usually water) that absorbs solutes from pieces of physical matter as it passes through, or over it. Landfills produce massive quantities of harmful leachate when rainwater falls onto garbage heaps, absorbing things like battery acid, lead, and chemicals. This water can then be transferred to soils, bodies of water, and in turn, animals and people. – See more at: http://organic-recycling.net/uncategorized/the-problems-with-landfills/#sthash.Xkezjmmf.dpuf

Our goal is to create a mandatory city recycling system for Missoula and to achieve Zero Waste of Resources by 2016.

If we achieve our goal, Missoula will be able to recycle any and all recyclable items with their normal garbage; materials of value  such as plastic, cardboard, paper, glass etc. will not be thrown away.

Montana landfills are only a temporary solution for waste management in our state. By achieving our goal of Zero Waste of Resources (ZWR) we are reducing the waste of products that could potentially be reused into a new product. We are also reducing wasted materials and bringing a higher demand for jobs in the recycling industries. This can ultimately help our local economy and develops sustainable use of resources.
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Where Does our Garbage go?

All of the City’s waste that does not get recycled is taken from your driveway and picked up Allied Waste Services. Allied waste then dumps and buries the garbage into a Missoula landfill. All landfills are designed to keep wasted materials from leaking out dangerous chemicals into the local watersheds.

  • Leachate – This refers to liquid (usually water) that absorbs solutes from pieces of physical matter as it passes through, or over it. Landfills produce massive quantities of harmful leachate when rainwater falls onto garbage heaps, absorbing things like battery acid, lead, and chemicals. This water can then be transferred to soils, bodies of water, and in turn, animals and people.
  • Sustainability – Landfills are unsustainable. There is only so much land in the world and every year about 175 million tons of refuse enter landfills. While some matter will decompose in landfills, some materials, like plastic and Styrofoam, will last millions of years. Every year landfills take up more and more space.
  • Cost – Landfills are costly to operate. Lining systems to protect against leachate are expensive, as is constantly treating water runoff.
  • Appearance – Landfills are, for obvious reasons, aesthetically displeasing. They are typically kept away from populated areas, but as the volume of waste increases, they will become more common.
  • Smell – For beyond obvious reasons, landfills are pretty offensive to our sense of smell.
  • Animal Hazards – Landfills are hazardous to animals. Even if leachate does not enter into the groundwater or nearby streams, it can pool to form puddles that birds drink from. Landfills also contain large quantities of contaminated foods that rodents, birds, and snakes have access to.
  • Human Hazards – While few people rush out to grab a bite at the old landfill, the entrance of leachate into streams can be dangerous. Landfills also contain hazardous chemicals potentially harmful to anyone who enters, be it employees or visitors.
  • Soil Contamination – Once land is used as a landfill, its soil invariables becomes contaminated. This means that it cannot be used for much else afterwards unless it undergoes a very lengthy remediation process.
  • Garbage Can Blow Away – Items from heaps of garbage can be caught by wind and taken out of landfills, and re-deposited in streams, parks, and residential areas.

- See more at: http://organic-recycling.net/uncategorized/the-problems-with-landfills/#sthash.Xkezjmmf.dpuf

Leachate – This refers to liquid (usually water) that absorbs solutes from pieces of physical matter as it passes through, or over it. Landfills produce massive quantities of harmful leachate when rainwater falls onto garbage heaps, absorbing things like battery acid, lead, and chemicals. This water can then be transferred to soils, bodies of water, and in turn, animals and people. – See more at: http://organic-recycling.net/uncategorized/the-problems-with-landfills/#sthash.Xkezjmmf.dpuf
  • Leachate – This refers to liquid (usually water) that absorbs solutes from pieces of physical matter as it passes through, or over it. Landfills produce massive quantities of harmful leachate when rainwater falls onto garbage heaps, absorbing things like battery acid, lead, and chemicals. This water can then be transferred to soils, bodies of water, and in turn, animals and people.
  • Sustainability – Landfills are unsustainable. There is only so much land in the world and every year about 175 million tons of refuse enter landfills. While some matter will decompose in landfills, some materials, like plastic and Styrofoam, will last millions of years. Every year landfills take up more and more space.
  • Cost – Landfills are costly to operate. Lining systems to protect against leachate are expensive, as is constantly treating water runoff.
  • Appearance – Landfills are, for obvious reasons, aesthetically displeasing. They are typically kept away from populated areas, but as the volume of waste increases, they will become more common.
  • Smell – For beyond obvious reasons, landfills are pretty offensive to our sense of smell.
  • Animal Hazards – Landfills are hazardous to animals. Even if leachate does not enter into the groundwater or nearby streams, it can pool to form puddles that birds drink from. Landfills also contain large quantities of contaminated foods that rodents, birds, and snakes have access to.
  • Human Hazards – While few people rush out to grab a bite at the old landfill, the entrance of leachate into streams can be dangerous. Landfills also contain hazardous chemicals potentially harmful to anyone who enters, be it employees or visitors.
  • Soil Contamination – Once land is used as a landfill, its soil invariables becomes contaminated. This means that it cannot be used for much else afterwards unless it undergoes a very lengthy remediation process.
  • Garbage Can Blow Away – Items from heaps of garbage can be caught by wind and taken out of landfills, and re-deposited in streams, parks, and residential areas.

- See more at: http://organic-recycling.net/uncategorized/the-problems-with-landfills/#sthash.Xkezjmmf.dpuf

  • Leachate – This refers to liquid (usually water) that absorbs solutes from pieces of physical matter as it passes through, or over it. Landfills produce massive quantities of harmful leachate when rainwater falls onto garbage heaps, absorbing things like battery acid, lead, and chemicals. This water can then be transferred to soils, bodies of water, and in turn, animals and people.
  • Sustainability – Landfills are unsustainable. There is only so much land in the world and every year about 175 million tons of refuse enter landfills. While some matter will decompose in landfills, some materials, like plastic and Styrofoam, will last millions of years. Every year landfills take up more and more space.
  • Cost – Landfills are costly to operate. Lining systems to protect against leachate are expensive, as is constantly treating water runoff.
  • Appearance – Landfills are, for obvious reasons, aesthetically displeasing. They are typically kept away from populated areas, but as the volume of waste increases, they will become more common.
  • Smell – For beyond obvious reasons, landfills are pretty offensive to our sense of smell.
  • Animal Hazards – Landfills are hazardous to animals. Even if leachate does not enter into the groundwater or nearby streams, it can pool to form puddles that birds drink from. Landfills also contain large quantities of contaminated foods that rodents, birds, and snakes have access to.
  • Human Hazards – While few people rush out to grab a bite at the old landfill, the entrance of leachate into streams can be dangerous. Landfills also contain hazardous chemicals potentially harmful to anyone who enters, be it employees or visitors.
  • Soil Contamination – Once land is used as a landfill, its soil invariables becomes contaminated. This means that it cannot be used for much else afterwards unless it undergoes a very lengthy remediation process.
  • Garbage Can Blow Away – Items from heaps of garbage can be caught by wind and taken out of landfills, and re-deposited in streams, parks, and residential areas.

- See more at: http://organic-recycling.net/uncategorized/the-problems-with-landfills/#sthash.Xkezjmmf.dpuf

alliedwaste

Landfill Cutaway

What are the problems (with landfills)?

Leachate - This refers to a liquid that absorbs solutes from pieces of matter as it passes through, or over it. When rain falls it passes through the garbage buried in landfills and absorbs things like battery acid, led, and dangerous chemicals. This water can then be transferred into bodies of water and in our soil and in turn into our animals and people.

Cost - The fact is, landfills are just expensive to operate. It takes a massive amount of plastic to to line the landfills and protect from leachate. With constant water run off this gets costly. And the cost of shipping garbage could be diverted to shipping recyclables and reducing our impact on the environment.

Sustainability – There is only so much land we can dig up and bury our garbage in. There are better ways to dispose of waste and by starting with recycling products that should not be thrown away to begin with we are making a good effort to reserve our resources.

Smell – Not to mention the offensive smells of rotting garbage can be pretty overwhelming at times.

Soil Contamination – Once land is used as a landfill, its soil then becomes contaminated and cannot be used for anything else unless it goes through a very extensive remediation process.

Human Hazards – Contaminated leachate waste chemicals can leak into our streams and watersheds which can be harmful to the people living near the landfill.

Animal Hazards - Despite efforts from landfills to keep contaminated waste contained many animals go in search of food in landfills, including birds, foxes, rodents and other animals that can spread illness and disease.

What are the solutions?

recyc9

This refers to liquid (usually water) that absorbs solutes from pieces of physical matter as it passes through, or over it. Landfills produce massive quantities of harmful leachate when rainwater falls onto garbage heaps, absorbing things like battery acid, lead, and chemicals. This water can then be transferred to soils, bodies of water, and in turn, animals and people – See more at: http://organic-recycling.net/uncategorized/the-problems-with-landfills/#sthash.Xkezjmmf.dpuf

 

By implementing a municipal solid waste plan and launching educational campaigns to spread awareness, these cooperative agreements within our community can indeed bring about a better recycling system.

Recycling

Recycling separates paper, cardboard, glass, metal, and other materials, from the garbage for reuse or reprocessing into new products. Recycling can reduce the size of your garbage can and the size of your garbage bill.

Over half of what people usually throw away can be recycled. The average Missoula resident generates over 4.5 lbs. of garbage each day and over a half ton of garbage each year. Your every day actions and decisions have a direct effect on the amount of waste generated in Missoula County.

Waste generation reduction:

Before you buy, use or discard something, ask yourself

Reduce: Do I really need to buy this?

Reuse: Can I or somebody else use the product again?

Recycle: Can I purchase the product with recycled content?

Rethink: Can I rent or borrow it instead?

Your every day actions and decisions have a direct effect on the amount of waste generated in Missoula County.

Looking west toward the Bitterroot Mountains o...

Looking west toward the Bitterroot Mountains over Missoula from Mount Sentinel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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